12 Comments
Feb 10Liked by Dan Hayes

Great story, brilliant music and a really mind blowing staging make this something special. The way the characters move around each other on what is a relatively small set is truly spectacular. Much more actual musical theatre than just another musical. Think you might guess that I'm a fan!

Expand full comment
Feb 10Liked by Dan Hayes

May I also say that the title of this musical is fabulous! It’s so intriguing and magical ✨🌤️🌔🌬️

Expand full comment
Feb 10Liked by Dan Hayes

Thankyou. I really enjoyed this article. Sharing it on FB to encourage my southern friends to go and see it!

Expand full comment

It seems a fair bet that none of this would have happened had the building itself been demolished a quarter of a century ago, as many clamoured for at the time (and some still do). The building itself would not have engendered the musical, of course: it is the stories of people that do that, with the fictional biographies in the musical acting as representatives for the thousands of real stories to which the building serves as an anchor, a memorial and a gateway. It demonstrates the folly of separating and judging different aspects of heritage. It is all one tapestry. Pull one thread, and the picture may vanish.

Expand full comment

I have a mosaic background (so to speak), and although my parents were both Londoners, I feel (and sound like) a Northerner. I did live in London for many years (as an adult), and it’s worryingly easy to get seduced into the only-London-matters mindset. I’m hoping like mad that this production will open the eyes of some Londoners (and other southern softies 😆) to the fact that there is a dynamic and wondrous world outside the south east of England. After all, most of us don’t live there!

Expand full comment

Saw is 2019 and I’ve never seen so many people both crying and giving a standing ovation at the theatre as I did that night.

I’m also really glad they’ve not diluted the references for the soft southerners 😁 because while it is undoubtedly a universal story in many respects, it’s first and foremost our story of our city. Plus the music is bloody good an all.

Expand full comment

Thank you for this very enjoyable article. SS'sE really is a very special 'hairs standing up on the back of the neck' show, managing to be uplifting, funny and tragic, all at the same time. I agree with all the comments below - I love Robin Hughe's image of the tapestry of heritage.

Expand full comment

I watched it last night. It went down really really well with the London audience, although I did hear someone say at half time 'it's alright but the musics a bit crap'. Blasphemy!

Expand full comment

I thought the production at the Crucible was excellent and I spoke to my brother who lives in London about it at the time. This is what he said about its success in London.

“The answer to that is YES going by the ticket sales. I went online looking for tickets on Saturday 2 March for a date who had expressed interest. Nothing left under £120 each. I took a friend to see it at The National where a % of tickets are £30. She loved it and even had a tear in her eye at the end. She is from rural Hampshire. I'm the only bit of Sheffield she has ever seen. It's not actually about Sheffield. It's a universal love story woven through the last 40 years. The songs alone make it worth seeing. Hawley is one of the worlds great song writers”.

Expand full comment

I haven't seen the musical yet, but the article makes a lot of sense to me. I compose stuff myself. In fact some years ago I composed an operatic duet for the two protagonists of "50 Shades of Grey." Yeah, thassright: "FSOG, the opera" 😀

Expand full comment