25 Comments

The facade of the Market Tavern -lets call it by its old name -which it should have kept -The Old No 12- could and should have been saved. My recent letter to the Star reflects my argument so I won't repeat it.Sheffield City Council, Councillors and Officers in the main don't regard heritage conservation as a vote winner and therefore not a priority.That's why we only have 1 -yes 1 conservation officer- hardly adequate for a city even which -according to a recent book on Sheffield [Fine's History and Guide to Sheffield] has lost most of its heritage- isn't adequate by any means - anyone interested in what is or should be an issue central to municipal planning seems not to stay long with the Council these days.Where is the Heritage Strategy and the championing of heritage in a situation like this? How many of the said Councillors will attend the Heritage Fair this weekend with one or two noble exceptions ? And the Civic Trust -have they a voice on such matters.Castlegate even with all its archaelogical and associated potential is the loser not forgetting ourselves for the loss of probably the finest public house facade in the city which survived the Luftwaffe but not a regeneration supposedly based on heritage.

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It breaks my heart, all the old buildings that are falling down. Sheffield needs more money, not the kind that wealthy property owners make from abusing their tenants but the kind that actually supports the city and makes things better for everyone.

In other news, I want that water tower house, please.

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I am disapointed Dan that you appear to dismiss heritage in the rather superficial comment 'this sort of thing'- I can imagine -sadly- that many councillors would make the same trite observation.And defending the council?

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The problem in Sheffield is that buildings which could have been saved at a relatively low cost many years ago, have been left to deteriorate to a point where they cannot be saved due to excessive costs. Part of me suspects some of these instances may actually suit the council as demolition leaves a nice developer friendly site. The central library building has been in trouble for over half of my 81 years. A lot of money and effort went in to courting a Chinese rescue that could have been spent on the actual building.

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As a relatively new Sheffielder, I’m not qualified to express anything but a fairly superficial opinion. However, I’m pleased to know that the old castle area is having archaeology done to it (is there a proper verb for that??), as having roots going back further than the steam-powered era is so inspiring.

I agree that people should express a view though, but we’d need to be aware of the approximate cost (both in cash terms and in terms of local disruption) of saving or renewing the built environment. It’s one of the ironies of the so-called Conservatives that their “austerity” means that we’re forced to choose between preserving our heritage and caring for our fellow citizens, be they children, the elderly, people with disabilities and so on. How do you compare the cost of an old building and the well-being of a child? As such a wealthy country, why do we even have to choose?

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I know Brian and Janet well -hence my comments about 'noble exxceptions' -why do other local authorities ie NE Derbys have 3 conservation officers?

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The Local List mentioned is found here: https://local-heritage-list.org.uk/south-yorkshire

It’s a public nominated list of places that people value. The nominations need to meet certain criteria be eligible but you can email the South Yorkshire Archaeology Service (who manage it) for assistance.

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I think this is really hard. Councils are hard pressed for cash and £200m to fix-up getting on for 300 buildings...something’s got to give. It’d be nice to see an assessment that says ‘these are the 300, we could put aside £x over X years, that’ll cover 100/50/2/250 of them so X many need to go’. I’d like to see councillors debate that. It’d be better than letting time and water damage decide which stay!

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There seems a thread going back decades of allowing buildings to decline to the point where suddenly they are unsafe, inconvenient and simply have to go. It will be a matter of time before the Salvation Army building is swept away.

The Market Tavern was part of the plans for Castlegate, so why wasn't essential repairs carried out.

We have a time limited window to spend the levelling up funds, to date we have knocked down a pub, refused to fully daylight the Sheaf and not so much as a portacabin on site.

I do hope there can be a Cambridge Steet style u-turn and the facade can be preserved.

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'This stuff' Dan really ! I don't think the pub could have been saved but the facade could have been.The Old No 12 was seen as being dispensable some years ago and I recollect protesting about it via a letter to the local press. I look forward to Robin Hughes comments in due course.Hope you are going to attend the heritage fair this weekend - come and have a hat-Ron

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Sorry to say this, Dan, but this article is quite a shallow dive into a deep and complex question. It'll take me a while to put together my personal view, but I'd like to share it with you once I have done so.

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Asking us all 'which building do you hate right now do you hate and think we can knock down?' is how you end up with Euston Station!

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If a building of interest has to come down, my question is always "What is going to take its place?"

"Little Boxes on the Hillside 🎼🎵🎶🎵🎶" - Malvina Reynolds

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It is so difficult trying to make decisions about these buildings. If it had survived could the building have been put to a viable use? The old town hall has stood empty for 25 years! Do we just leave it if nobody expressed an interest in using it? I do not know the answer.

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